Monday, September 19, 2016

Student Centered Classroom and Reflection



Combining the first week's charge of "student centered learning" with last week's focus on"reflection,"  take a moment and read the bullets below.  Self reflect: How many of those bullets are present in your class today?

  • Students are working at their own stations- choosing where to learn based on what works best for them.
  • Students are working at their own pace– for example, one student may be way further ahead than another student in math.
  • The teacher has classroom management strategies for handling the differentiation.
  • Student work is visible in the classroom and the hallways- and all students are represented.
  • Objectives or lesson plans are visible. Many students are visual learners so the classrooms is organized. It is clear what students are doing and working on.
  • Students are doing the bulk of the work and the talking. (In other words, don’t be afraid of a loud classroom).
  • Students are working on various projects- they are doing hands-on, real work.
  • Students are using technology to learn more about their own interests or to move at their own pace.
  • There is a high degree of student engagement which looks like enthusiasm, excitement, and passion. (If you see a lot of bored students, it’s probably a good idea to ask why)..
  • Adults are talking to each other respectfully and learning from one another. Adults are modeling the ways students behave. If the adults are having fun, connecting, and learning from one another, the students will too.
  • Are the kids having fun? If there’s no joy, there’s no learning

15 comments:

  1. Clearly all of this is happening in my classroom all the time....just kidding. After looking at this, I know that I am one of the teachers who is more afraid of a loud classroom. I am trying to loosen the reigns a little when it comes to that, but a loud classroom stresses me out. For those of us who are very type A, the loud classroom is kind of daunting because for a lot of us, I think that symbolizes the release of some control and that's scary. I recognize that to be a point of weakness for myself as an educator!

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    1. ha, you know me... the louder the better... they can have at it!

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  2. Experimenting with Google classroom and Digital Read works does just that! I am so excited to try and see!

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  3. So pumped for Google Classroom!

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  4. I am not doing enough of these often enough. I don't know how anyone could implement all of these at one time. Maybe making sure you are doing these on a regular basis is more realistic??

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  5. Alana Anderson9/19/2016 9:29 AM

    I have to agree with Kim. Sometimes I feel that a loud classroom is out of control. This year already I have made it a goal to let students work together more often. One thing I have learned is that I have to teach my students what turning and talking looks like or what working with a partner should look like. We have discussed what noise level is appropriate and although we haven't mastered it yet, I know that we will get there!

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    1. I've learned over the years to listen for "work noise"... are the students talking about the work in front of them, or are they off on side conversations, gossip, etc? If I heard more side discussion, I simply ask, "are we on task"... it usually brings them back to center. As for noise levels... I found this app a couple of weeks ago... it helps keep the noise to a "library" level (usually) http://bouncyballs.org

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  6. I find this much easier to go with my smaller classes. I am struggling with my larger class with this. In reference to the noise in class, I have been able to learn to listen for key terms. I can hear when the groups are off task. This is what my problem is, certain students are needing quite a bit of PBIS to be functional in a group.

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  7. I agree with Alana. We definitely have to teach the Turn and Talk, and what appropriate volume is. There has to be a balance between silent, independent working time and collaboration.

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  8. I do, turn to your shoulder partner or speak to your face partner but I'm always afraid of the noise level too and kids not staying on task. So I'm walking around and making sure everyone is asking and answering in Spanish with a partner. Should it be happening everyday? Should I be brainstorming student centered activities everyday for each lesson?

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  9. Tagging onto Timberly's "Maybe".....Maybe the entire list doesn't get done everyday....agreed! Maybe it's about asking myself if I am making every effort to engage all of my students for the time I have them in my classroom. Which means choosing resources and activities that fit best for each lesson.

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    1. I'm agreeing with Rhonda, as usual! Often we try too much, and when it doesn't succeed, we think it a failure. However, if we were to give ourselves a gradual release there likely would be a better result.

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  11. I need to do more too. I like A/B teaching for reinforcement. "Students remember 90% of what they teach to others." The repetition seems to work. Personal Goal: A/B Teach at least 3 times a week....OK at least two.

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